Rani-ki-Vav (the Queens’s Stepwell)

Rani-ki-Vav is an intricately constructed stepwell situated in the town of Patan in the Indian state of Gujarat. Patan which lays about 130km northwest of Ahmedabad, was an ancient Hindu capital before being sacked by Mahmud of Ghazni in 1024 AD. Rani-ki-Vav is an excellent example of its former glory. This UNESCO World Heritage Site is situated on the banks of Saraswati River. This stepwell is the finest in Gujarat and remarkably well preserved after it was restored in the 1980s. It bagged the title of “Cleanest Iconic Place” in India at the Indian Sanitation Conference in October 2016.

This stepwell was constructed during the rule of the Chalukya dynasty. It is believed that it was built in memory of Bhima I (1022-1064AD) by his widowed queen Udayamati and probably completed by Udayamati and Karna after his death. The stepwell was later flooded by the nearby Saraswati River and silted over until the late 1980s.

Rani-ki-Vav was built in the Maru-Gurjara architectural style. This well measures approximately 64 m long, 20 m wide and 27 m deep. It consists of many pillared pavilions at seven different levels. Minute and exquisite carvings adorn the walls of the well. Most of the sculptures are in devotion to Vishnu depicted in his ten incarnations. It also depicts Nagkanya, Yogini and Apsaras. Apsaras are depicted in 16 different style of make-up to look more attractive which is called Solah-shringar.

Rani-ki-Vav
Rani-ki-Vav
Detailed carvings
Detailed carvings
Intricately carved pillars
Intricately carved pillars
Detailed carvings
Detailed carvings
Intricately carved walls
Intricately carved walls
Detailed carvings
Detailed carvings
Detailed carvings
Detailed carvings
Detailed carvings - an incarnation of Vishnu
Detailed carvings – an incarnation of Vishnu
An intricately carved wall
An intricately carved wall
Detailed carvings
Detailed carvings
Detailed carvings
Detailed carvings
Detailed carvings
Detailed carvings
Detailed carvings
Detailed carvings
Detailed carvings
Detailed carvings
One of the pillared pavilions
One of the pillared pavilions
Detailed carvings
Detailed carvings
Intricately carved walls
Intricately carved walls
Pillared pavilions
Pillared pavilions
Detailed carvings
Detailed carvings
Detailed carvings
Detailed carvings
Detailed carvings
Detailed carvings
Pillared pavilions
Pillared pavilions
Inside one of the pavilions
Inside one of the pavilions
Detailed carvings
Detailed carvings
More details
More details
More details
More details
View of the stepwell from the top
View of the stepwell from the top

This stepwell was not merely a site for collecting water and socialising, but also hold great spiritual significance. It explicit the ancient concept of the sanctity of water and they considered it as an inverted temple. There are around 800 elaborate sculptures among seven galleries. At the bottom level there is a carving of Vishnu reclines on the thousand-hooded serpent. There is also a small gate below the last step of the step well, with a 30km tunnel (currently blocked by stones and mud), which leads to the town of Sidhpur near Patan. It was used as an escape gateway for the king, in times of defeat.

Rani-ki-Vav is situated in an earthquake prone area and due to this Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) has put it on high alert regarding the risk preparedness and disaster management. Only the top 2 levels of the well are accessible to the visitors and the rest of the areas are out of bound to the visitors.

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25 thoughts on “Rani-ki-Vav (the Queens’s Stepwell)”

  1. Its intriguing to note that both in ancient Indian and Indo-European cultures, the use of nudity of near nudity in sculpting is quite acceptable. Contrast this to the north Asian cultures of China and Japan where this is frowned upon!

    Like

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