Ahmedabad – Part X: Sidi Bashir Mosque and the Shaking Minarets

This mosque is believed to be constructed by Sidi Bashir, a slave of Sultan Ahmed Shah. The mosque was constructed in 1452. Only the minarets and arched central gateway remain today, as the body of the remaining part of the mosque was destroyed in 1753 during the war between the Marathas and the Gujarat Sultanate.
The mosque is famed for its 21.3 meter high shaking minarets (jhulta minars). A gentle shaking of either of the minarets results in the other minaret vibrating, though the connecting passage between them remains free of vibration. The minarets were designed to shake to protect against earthquake damage, which certainly worked in 2001.

The Shaking Minarets of Sidi Bashir Mosque
The Shaking Minarets of Sidi Bashir Mosque
A closer view of one of the minarets
A closer view of one of the minarets
The arched gateway
The arched gateway
Architectural details of the pillars
Architectural details of the pillars
Architectural details of the pillars
Architectural details of the pillars
Architectural details of the pillars
Architectural details of the pillars
Architectural details of the pillars
Architectural details of the pillars
Architectural details of the pillars
Architectural details of the pillars
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Ahmedabad – Part IX: The Pattharwali Masjid or Qutbuddin’s Mosque

This Mosque is one of the less explored mosques in Ahmedabad, but rich in intricate carvings and Hindu elements in its design. The mosque was constructed in 1449 during the reign of Sultan Muhammed Shah II by Nizam son of Hilal.

Pattharwali Masjid or Qutbuddin’s Mosque
Pattharwali Masjid or Qutbuddin’s Mosque
The main entrance of the mosque
The main entrance of the mosque
The main entrance and pillars
The main entrance and pillars
The tank in front of the mosque
The tank in front of the mosque
The jaali work around the tank
The jaali work around the tank
Architectural details
Architectural details
Architectural details
Architectural details
Architectural details
Architectural details
Architectural details
Architectural details
Architectural details
Architectural details
Architectural details
Architectural details
Architectural details
Architectural details

Acknowledgement:
I would like to express my special thanks to Mr. Narendra J Otia (njotia@gmail.com), a heritage enthusiast and photographer for his help and assistance in exploring the various mosques and temples in Ahmedabad.

Ahmedabad – Part VIII: Rani Sipri’s Mosque and Tomb

This small mosque is also known as Masjid-e-Nagira (Jewel of a Mosque) due to its graceful construction. The mosque is named after the Hindu queen of Sultan Mahmud Begada, Rani Sipri. The queen commissioned this mosque in 1514 AD when her husband executed their son for some minor misdemeanour. After her death, the queen was buried in this mosque. This mosque is remarkable with delicately carved minarets (which survived many earthquakes) and domed tomb with fine jaali screens (lattice windows).

Rani Sipri’s Mosque
Rani Sipri’s Mosque
Rani Sipri’s Mosque - interior view
Rani Sipri’s Mosque – interior view
An intricately carved pillar - details
An intricately carved pillar – details
Architectural details
Architectural details
Architectural details
Architectural details
Architectural details
Architectural details
View from back side of the mosque
View from back side of the mosque
Rani Sipri’s Tomb
Rani Sipri’s Tomb
Rani Sipri’s Tomb
Rani Sipri’s Tomb
Jaali work on the tomb
Jaali work on the tomb
Jaali work on the tomb
Jaali work on the tomb
Architectural details of the tomb
Architectural details of the tomb
Architectural details of the tomb
Architectural details of the tomb

Eurasian collared dove

Often called simply as collared doves, they breed close to human habitation wherever food resources are abundant and there are trees for nesting. It is a medium sized dove, distinctly smaller than the wood pigeon, similar in length to rock pigeon but slimmer and longer-tailed. The eye is surrounded by a small area of bare skin, which is either white or yellow. The two sexes are virtually indistinguishable and juveniles differ in having a poorly developed collar and a brown iris.

eurasian-collared-dove-1

eurasian-collared-dove-2

eurasian-collared-dove-3

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Ahmedabad – Part VII: Rani Rupamati’s Mosque

This mosque was built by Mahmud Begada during 1430-1440 AD. The mosque is named after Rani Rupamati the wife of Sultan Qutubuddin. After the death of Qutubuddin his brother, Mahmud Begada became the sultan and he married Rani Rupamati. The mosque has three domes and slim minarets. These minarets were collapsed during the earthquake of 1819. This is one of the mosques where an attempt was made to combine the arched Islamic and flat Hindu styles. The mosque is remarkable due its richly carved lattice windows and balconies.

Rani Rupamati’s Mosque
Rani Rupamati’s Mosque
Rani Rupamati’s Mosque - main entrance and the pillars
Rani Rupamati’s Mosque – main entrance and the pillars
The qiblah inside the mosque
The qiblah inside the mosque
Pillars inside the mosque
Pillars inside the mosque
Intricately carved balconies
Intricately carved balconies
Architectural details
Architectural details
Architectural details
Architectural details
One of the carved windows
One of the carved windows
Architectural details
Architectural details
Architectural details
Architectural details
View from back side of the mosque
View from back side of the mosque

Close to the mosque in the same compound, is the tomb of Rani Rupamati and the other queen. These tombs were covered by a large central dome and two side domes.

The tomb of Rani Rupamati and the other queen
The tomb of Rani Rupamati and the other queen
The tomb of Rani Rupamati and the other queen
The tomb of Rani Rupamati and the other queen
Inside view
Inside view
View of the central dome and one of the small domes
View of the central dome and one of the small domes

Ahmedabad – Part VI: Sidi Saiyyed Mosque

Built in 1573, this mosque is one of the most famous mosques of Ahmedabad due to its stone carved lattice work windows. Popularly known as Sidi Saiyyed ni Jaali, this mosque was built by Sidi Saiyyed, an Abyssinian one of the advisors of Bilal Jhajar Khan, general in the army of the last Sultan Shams-ud-din Muzaffar Shah III.

The mosque was built in the last year of the existence of Sultanate of Gujarat. The mosque has beautifully carved ten stone lattice work windows (jaalis) on the side and rear arches. The rear wall is filled with square stone pierced panels in geometrical designs. These intricately carved lattice stone windows have designs of intertwined trees and foliage and a palm motif. The mosque was used as government office during British rule in 1880 AD. During this period paper casts of the carved screens were taken and two wooden models were made for museum of Kensington and New York. Today one of the jaali depicting the tree of life has become distinguished symbol of the city of Ahmedabad and the inspiration for the design of the logo of the Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad.

It is observed that the central window arch of the mosque is walled with stones instead of lattice work. Probably the mosque was not completed as per the original plan before the Mughals invaded Gujarat.

Sidi Saiyyed Mosque
Sidi Saiyyed Mosque
Sidi Saiyyed Mosque - View with the tank in front of the Mosque
Sidi Saiyyed Mosque – View with the tank in front of the Mosque
Sidi Saiyyed Mosque
Sidi Saiyyed Mosque
The view of the Jaali from inside
The view of the Jaali from inside
Architectural details
Architectural details
Architectural details
Architectural details
A congregation is on in the mosque
A congregation is on in the mosque
Jaali - more detailed view
Jaali – more detailed view
Architectural details
Architectural details
A tomb inside the Mosque complex
A tomb inside the Mosque complex
Architectural details - external view
Architectural details – external view
Architectural details - external view
Architectural details – external view
Architectural details - external view
Architectural details – external view
Architectural details - external view
Architectural details – external view
Architectural details - external view
Architectural details – external view

Feathered Friends – V

White wagtail
White wagtail
White wagtail
White wagtail
White wagtail
White wagtail
Common kingfisher
Common kingfisher
Common kingfisher
Common kingfisher
Jungle babbler
Jungle babbler
Jungle babbler
Jungle babbler
Jungle babbler
Jungle babbler
Green bee-eater with kill
Green bee-eater with kill
White-eared bulbul
White-eared bulbul
White-eared bulbul
White-eared bulbul
Green bee-eater
Green bee-eater
Green bee-eater
Green bee-eater
Green bee-eater
Green bee-eater