Warangal Fort – A Legacy of the Kakatiya era

Warangal Fort is situated in Warangal in the Indian state of Telangana. It existed since 12th century when it was the capital of the Kakatiya dynasty. Most of the fort is in ruins and you can see the ancient fort walls scattered around the area. Warangal fort is spread over a radius of 19 km between Warangal and Hanamakonda. It was constructed during the reign of King Ganapti Deva and his daughter Rudramma Devi who ruled until 1289 AD and then under her grandson Prataparudra II, whose reign came to be known as the ‘Golden Age’ of Kakatiya dynasty.

The fort has four ornamental gates or arches, known as ‘Kakatiya Kala Thoranam’, that originally formed the entrances to the now ruined great Shiva temple. This Kakatiyan arch has been adopted and officially incorporated into the Emblem of Telangana state after the state formation in 2014. The temple inside the fort was dedicated to the Mother Earth, Swayambhudevi.

In 1323, Muhammad bin Tughluq marched to Warangal with 65,000 mounted soldiers carrying archery, attacked the fort and plundered and destroyed the city. In keeping with tradition, he ordered the destruction of the Swayambhu Shiva temple where the state deity has been deified. All that is now visible of the temple are remnants scattered around the fort. There are many ruins of wall slabs, brackets and ceiling panels, which are exhibited in the outdoor museum.

Warangal Fort - one of the ornamental gates or arches, known as ‘Kakatiya Kala Thoranam’
Warangal Fort – one of the ornamental gates or arches, known as ‘Kakatiya Kala Thoranam’
Warangal Fort -   ‘Kakatiya Kala Thoranam’, the details
Warangal Fort – ‘Kakatiya Kala Thoranam’, the details
Warangal Fort - one of the ornamental gates or arches, known as ‘Kakatiya Kala Thoranam’
Warangal Fort – one of the ornamental gates or arches, known as ‘Kakatiya Kala Thoranam’
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort - you can see the minute details of the dress and ornaments
Relics from the fort – you can see the minute details of the dress and ornaments
Relics from the fort - a pillar
Relics from the fort – a pillar
Relics from the fort - a monolithic Nandi statue
Relics from the fort – a monolithic Nandi statue
Relics from the fort - some of the wall panels
Relics from the fort – some of the wall panels
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort

warangal-fort-11

Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort

warangal-fort-21

Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort - this part of the ceiling
Relics from the fort – this part of the ceiling
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort - part of the ceiling
Relics from the fort – part of the ceiling
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort
Relics from the fort

Within 150 meters of the archaeological zone is the Kush Mahal, which is a public hall built in the 14th century by the Delhi Sultans, who had captured the fort. The mahal which is rectangular in shape is built with huge sloping walls, sliced by six arched openings on each of its sides. There are approach steps on the northeast corner that provides access to the top of the structure, which has scenic views of the entire fort complex. Unfortunately, I didn’t take a picture of Kush Mahal (or may be it got deleted by mistake) but I have the pictures of the exhibits and also views from the top of Kush Mahal.

One of the relics exhibited in the gallery of Kush Mahal
One of the relics exhibited in the gallery of Kush Mahal
One of the relics exhibited in the gallery of Kush Mahal
One of the relics exhibited in the gallery of Kush Mahal
One of the relics exhibited in the gallery of Kush Mahal
One of the relics exhibited in the gallery of Kush Mahal
One of the relics exhibited in the gallery of Kush Mahal
One of the relics exhibited in the gallery of Kush Mahal
View from top of Kush Mahal
View from top of Kush Mahal
View from top of Kush Mahal
View from top of Kush Mahal

Within the southern quarter of the archaeological zone is a big water tank. Inside this tank is a distinctive natural rock formation that protrudes above the water surface. This is called locally as Ourugallu (Single Rock) in Telugu, giving the name Warangal to the fort. A small temple is built over this rock. From the top of the rock one can get the panoramic view of the surrounding area.

The natural rock formation that protrudes above the water surface - There are stairs cut out to reach to the summit
The natural rock formation that protrudes above the water surface – There are stairs cut out to reach to the summit
The temple at the tope of the rock formation
The temple at the tope of the rock formation
The view from the top of the rock
The view from the top of the rock
The view from the top of the rock
The view from the top of the rock
The view from the top of the rock
The view from the top of the rock
The view from the top of the rock
The view from the top of the rock
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29 thoughts on “Warangal Fort – A Legacy of the Kakatiya era”

  1. I am certainly glad that at least those remnants and relics of the temple to Shiva and Mother Earth were saved. They are beautiful–amazing carving. Lovely photos, as always. I especially like the interesting angles on the statuary and the views from above of the countryside.

    Like

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