Ramappa Temple – The living example of Kakatiya architecture

Ramappa Temple also known as the Ramalingeswara temple is located in Palampet village 77 km from Warangal in the Indian state of Telangana. The temple is a marvelous example of Kakatiyan creative genius, with beautiful art, intricate carvings adorning the walls, pillars and ceilings. The roof of the temple is built with bricks, which are so light that they are able to float in water.

According to inscriptions the temple was built in 1213 AD by Recherla Rudra, an army general of Kakatiya ruler Ganapati Deva. The temple is known by the name of the architect Ramappa, who built it. It took 40 years to build this temple. Lord Shiva is worshiped in this temple as Ramalingeswara. The hall in front of the sanctum has numerous carved pillars that have been positioned to create an effect that combines light and space. The temple had remained intact even after repeated wars and natural disasters. There was a major earthquake during the 17th century which caused some damages to the temple.

The temple stands on a raised platform with lateral porched entrances on three sides. The main entrance faces east. The sanctum contains a black basalt linga installed on a high pedestal. Over the ceiling of the main hall is depicted the scenes from Ramayana, Siva Purana and other mythological narratives. The striking peculiarity of the building lies in the arrangement of bracket figures, above the kakashasana level decorated with slender graceful madanikas, Naginis etc. in different poses.
There are two small Shiva shrines on either side of the main temple. One of them has an enormous Nandi within, facing the shrine of Shiva which is in very good condition.

Ramappa Temple
Ramappa Temple
Ramappa Temple - A closer view
Ramappa Temple – A closer view
Remappa Temple - Details
Remappa Temple – Details
Remappa Temple - Details
Remappa Temple – Details
Remappa Temple - Around the temple
Remappa Temple – Around the temple
A stone inscription in the temple grounds
A stone inscription in the temple grounds
The Nandi statue facing the temple
The Nandi statue facing the temple
Detailed carvings on the outer walls
Detailed carvings on the outer walls
The entrance
The entrance
These exquisitely carved female forms of Madanikas, Nagins etc. are considered to be the marvels of Kakatiya architecture
These exquisitely carved female forms of Madanikas, Nagins etc. are considered to be the marvels of Kakatiya architecture
More Carvings
More Carvings
Another detail of the temple
Another detail of the temple
The detailed carvings on the outer walls
The detailed carvings on the outer walls
More of the Madanikas, Nagins etc.
More of the Madanikas, Nagins etc.
More of the Madanikas, Nagins etc.
More of the Madanikas, Nagins etc.
More architectural details of the temple
More architectural details of the temple
More architectural details of the temple
More architectural details of the temple
The detailed carvings on the outer walls
The detailed carvings on the outer walls
The detailed carvings on the outer walls
The detailed carvings on the outer walls
The detailed carvings on the outer walls
The detailed carvings on the outer walls
More architectural details of the temple
More architectural details of the temple
The detailed carvings on the outer walls
The detailed carvings on the outer walls
The detailed carvings on the outer walls
The detailed carvings on the outer walls
The detailed carvings on the outer walls
The detailed carvings on the outer walls
More of the Madanikas, Nagins etc.
More of the Madanikas, Nagins etc.
More of the Madanikas, Nagins etc.
More of the Madanikas, Nagins etc.
The main hall of the temple with exquisitely carved pillars
The main hall of the temple with exquisitely carved pillars
One of the pillars
One of the pillars
Details of one of the ceilings
Details of one of the ceilings
Details of a carved pillar
Details of a carved pillar
Details of one of the ceilings
Details of one of the ceilings
The door to the sanctum
The door to the sanctum

About a kilometer away from the temple is a lake known as ‘Ramappa Cheruvu’. The lake was constructed in the 13th century and is a magnificent example of irrigation work of Kakatiya Rulers. It is spread over an area of more than 82 square kms with lush greenery all around. The lake is overlooked by beautiful hills in the background providing spectacular views.

The lake near the temple - ‘Ramappa Cheruvu’
The lake near the temple – ‘Ramappa Cheruvu’
The lake near the temple - ‘Ramappa Cheruvu’
The lake near the temple – ‘Ramappa Cheruvu’
The lake near the temple - ‘Ramappa Cheruvu’
The lake near the temple – ‘Ramappa Cheruvu’
The lush greenery around the lake
The lush greenery around the lake

How to Reach:
From Warangal and Hanamakonda, there are frequent bus services to Mulugu which is at a distance of 50 km. From Mulugu there are frequent buses available to Palampet which is at a distance of around 20 km. The temple is around 500 meters from here.

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26 thoughts on “Ramappa Temple – The living example of Kakatiya architecture”

  1. I like to see these old temples. Long ago people takes time to build buildings. Nowadays they build with what’s cheap and what’s to get done fast. When bad weather comes, everything comes tumbling down but these old buildings last for hundreds of years. I wonder how they done it when back then there were no technologies, how did they create a building that last a lifetime hehe (sorry for rambling 😂)

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