Mesmerizing Ladakh – Part 2: The Ancient Leh Palace

The construction of this place was initiated by Tsewang Namgyal, the founder of the Namgyal dynasty of Ladakh in 1553 and was completed by his nephew Sengge Namgyal, the most illustrious king of Ladakh. It resembles Potala Palace in Lhasa, though in comparison much smaller. The palace has nine storeys and the upper floors accommodated the royal family while the lower floors held stables and store rooms. The palace was abandoned when Dogra forces took control of Ladakh in the mid-19th century and the royal family moved to Stok Palace.

The material used in the construction of the palace is stone, mud bricks, poplar wood, mud mortar and wooden rafters. The mud plaster utilized locally known as Mar-kalak.

The palace is in ruins and being restored by the Archaeological Survey of India. The palace is open to the public and the roof provides panoramic views of Leh and surrounding areas and in the back ground is the rising Ladakh mountain ranges. The imposing structure, speak of the royal glory of the bygone era.

Leh Mosque and in the backdrop is Leh Palace
Leh Mosque and in the backdrop is Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace
Leh Palace top
Leh Palace top
View from the top of the palace
View from the top of the palace
View from the top of the palace
View from the top of the palace
View from the top of the palace
View from the top of the palace
View from the top of the palace
View from the top of the palace
View from the top of the palace
View from the top of the palace
View from the top of the palace
View from the top of the palace
View from the top of the palace
View from the top of the palace
Around the palace
Around the palace
Locals dressed in traditional style, posing for the camera
Locals dressed in traditional style, posing for the camera
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